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Protecting Your Legacy

Probate & estate administration concerns not unusual in Texas

| Jul 6, 2016 | Probate & Estate Administration |

Without the proper information, many Texas residents could find themselves wondering how to handle the estate of a late loved one. Individuals may be uncertain whether they can obtain access to a decedent’s will, and any number of issues could arise. In most instances, a seasoned probate & estate administration attorney can help identify and resolve any problems.

The executor will be responsible for ensuring that the contents of the will are carried out properly. However, some may find themselves in conflict with the executor if he or she is not necessarily forthcoming with information. Luckily, there are legal procedures that must be followed when it comes to an estate going through probate.

A will is made part of the public record once it has been filed with the court. As a result, interested individuals could obtain a copy of it at that time. There are instances in which individuals may need to view the will, such as if they have been named beneficiaries. Once viewed, issues regarding the will could arise if an individual or individuals contest the contents of the will, in which case legal proceedings will be necessary.

Losing a loved one is difficult under any circumstances, and if the matter becomes complicated by estate issues, those affected may begin to feel overwhelmed. Luckily, there may be answers readily available for Texas residents who may want clarification on certain concerns. Information on probate & estate administration duties and procedures may prove useful, and consulting with an experienced attorney may also be worth considering.

Source: centralctcommunications.com, “Senior Signals: Who can see the will?”, Daniel O. Tully, June 27, 2016